Ernie Dingo and I

Posted in Uncategorized on June 25, 2013 by marvynmc

Ernie Dingo and I

Met up with Ernie Dingo when he visited us to give us an inspirational speech…what a day

My Version of a Sonnet: One Legal Fiction Still Remains

Posted in My Writings, Poems with tags , , , , on September 20, 2009 by marvynmc
Nhangka,

Starting to write again for my own pleasure and happiness after many years of writing grant submissions and reports for communities and governments.

Much of my writing is always influenced by my Aboriginality and Personal Life Experiences and thus much of my writing will often be of a political nature.

I am currently experimenting with the many different forms of writing, prose and poems.

I often find it difficult to keep strictly to the rhyming scheme and rules of writing poetry, prose, sonnets or verse etc because English is such a hard and difficult language to learn and write.

But anyway nevertheless here is my own personal version of a 14 line sonnet although I must admit the structure and prose do not actually follow the normal Shakespearean Sonnet, or English sonnet, but who cares, not I, as long as I write for myself and others enjoy it and get the message within it.

One Legal Fiction Still Remains
© 2009 Walha Udi Marvyn McKenzie Snr

Here we stand upon our ancestral land,
Oppressed, battered, disregarded we shed our tears,
We never gave it away willingly but made our stand,
And throughout we have always shouted out our many fears,

The legal fiction of Terra Nullius finally torn down,
But one legal fiction still upon their hearts and minds remain,
For how can we prove Aboriginal Sovereignty without a crown?
And whilst not yet achieved thus will always be a stain,

A stain as such remains our shared future can not we achieve,
A shared future achievement of honour, respect and equality,
Their actions, words and promises continue through a sieve,
Vanished always upon the wind once uttered meekly,

On one concept, idea and opinion we will always strongly stand,
Always was and always will be Aboriginal land.

Elders Must Respect Youth Before We Expect Our Youth To Respect Our Elders

Posted in culture, Family, Health & Wellbeing, My Beliefs, My Writings, Uncategorized with tags , , on September 5, 2009 by marvynmc
Respect based on age alone and seniority without competency is a thing of the past.
Confucius
China’s most famous teacher, philosopher, and political theorist, 551-479 BC, Confucius once said:

“A youth is to be regarded with respect. How do you know that his (or her) future will not be equal to our present?”

Some Elders often believe they should receive automatic immediate respect from their Youth just because of their old age.

Such Elders have forgotten that respect must first be earned by their words, actions and deeds, and not solely dependent on their age.

Respect is earned and must be returned to our Youth.

How can our Youth respect us Elders if we do not first show and demonstrate our respect for them and each other.

One day our Youth will become our Elders so it is very important that we Elders set an example for them to follow.

J.B. Priestly once said:

There was no respect for youth when I was young, and now that I am old, there is no respect for age–I missed it coming and going.

One of the main foundation cornerstone for building Respect for other People in your life begins within your own Heart, Mind and Spirit, for before you can even begin building Respect for others You must first learn to Respect Yourself.

John Herschel once said:

Self-respect is the cornerstone of all virtue.

Confucius also once said:

Respect yourself and others will respect you.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky once said:

“If you want to be respected by others the great thing is to respect yourself. Only by that, only by self-respect will you compel others to respect you.”

We Elders today have a great responsibility upon our shoulder to nurture and teach our Youth Respect so that one day our Youth may one day themselves become good Elders to their Youth.

Our Youth are not just our Future

They are in Fact our Future Elders.

Words of Encouragement

Posted in Aboriginal, Australia, culture, Depression, Education, Health, Health & Wellbeing, Mental Health, mudha, My Beliefs, My Writings, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on August 19, 2009 by marvynmc

Nhangka All,

What is on me mind…..hmmmmm

Having worked within all levels of urban, regional, and remote Aboriginal Affairs for 28 years, since I was aged 16 years old, mainly here in Port Augusta, and often at the grass root level, I have seen and done it all, well most of it anyway, as both worker and sometimes even the clientele.

I know fully that working for and with our Peoples it can become very hard and difficult job at times because it demands long hours, time away from family, no time to visit your ancient lands if you live and work away from it, and a lot of personal stress and heartache for there is often much pain and hurt out there in our community.

Such community work with our people often goes unrewarded or recognised by others, but most of us do not worry about such personal honour or glory – just a simple Thank You often suffices or the silent fruitful and postive outcomes we see and achieve later on in some of our peoples lives.

Some times you will be often knocked flat by the very People You are trying to help, by Your own Family and even white fellas – but never give up, when knocked flat to the ground, pick yourself up from the ground, dust yourself off, and go into the fray again and again.

But do not burn yourself out – always have an outlet and periods of rest and relaxation away from it all and recharge your batteries – for if you cannot look after yourself how can you ever hope to look after others…

I live away from my Ancient Lands and Waters, lucky to be descended from three or more Aboriginal Language Groups so I can claim and visit a few, rather than just one, always say to people ‘Born and Raised in Port Augusta, especially Ummeewarra Reserve when segregation was still the political vogue, But Not My Country.

So I try my hardest to make time to go back to Country – to visit my Ancient Lands, Waters and Family.

I recently made this quote up mainly for my Grandfather’s mob, Adnyamathanha Yura of the Northern Flinders Ranges, but it could also be relevant to others:

Those who lose our Mudha (general traditions) are lost in the thorny wilderness of the Utnyu (corpse, Europeans) and they must return to our Yarta (Lands), take off their shoes so that their bare feet can touch our Yarta so that the Spiritual Engery of our Yarta can once again flow through them and they can be renewed. They must wash their face in the Awi (waters) of our Yarta so that their physical self can also be cleansed.

If you live and work away from your Ancient Lands and Water then simply make similiar connections to the Lands and Waters you may live and work on, or simply sit yourself under an unshaded tree at Sunrise or early morning light, close your eyes, and listen – listen to the wind as it rustles through the leaves and feel it flow through and around you. Listen to the first sounds and calls of the birds as they awake and sing to the dawning of a new day – Let the morning rays of Yundu (the sun) energise you by turning your face upwards towards it with closed eyes – and just be be still and silent.

I do this every morning now and it refreshes and empowers me for the day ahead.

A second but still relevant thought I think….

You know every NAIDOC Day here in Port Augusta I try to always be there with my camera to capture for all time the moments and memories of the day, especially, the Award Ceremony and their Recipiants, but after I take such Award shots I then often look around the crowd for other shots to take, and what do I see?

I see many of our unsung community heros sitting and standing admidst the crowded sea of faces, especially some of our old Elders, many now in their wheel chairs or with their walking canes, who had to fight for our Aboriginal Rights at a time when it was not so politically, socially or legally acceptable to do so.

I see some of our young people sitting or standing nearby some of our Elderly unsung Heroes, and think to myself, little do they know they are nearby some of the Giants of our community – the ones who did the hard yakka and work to ensure we, they, can now sit and stand in this public place to celebrate and march down the streets where we were once not permitted to even walk, let alone march, because they knocked and tore down the physical and invisible political walls that once segregated and oppressed our Peoples.

One day some of us may become like these, our Elders, but we should always feel honoured for we will be joining a long list of many of our unsung genuine respected Aboriginal Heroes and Giants.

Worried Police plead for Hindley St help

Posted in Australia, My Beliefs, politics, South Australia with tags , , , , , on August 15, 2009 by marvynmc
We need more Police numbers on the Street Level to ensure the peace and safety of the general public and we need more Teachers numbers in the schools to ensure our youth are fully educated so that they become good citizens.
Why is it that within Australian Society our Sports People, who only play a game on weekends or for a limited season, are paid astronomical wages and given more accoclades than the real, often unsung, heroes of our communities, Police, Teachers, Fireman, Nurses and Doctors.In order to achieve such things we need to ensure that we pay them a good wage and good working conditions so that more of our citizens want to become a Police Officer or a Teacher.

Even the politicians receive more money and benefits for their often useless political rhetoric and posturing than our real community heroes: Police, Teachers, Fireman, Nurses and Doctors.